The development team, from left, Scot Car, an architect with Public 47 Architects, Nate Hickey, project manager with Shilshole Development, Mike Yukevich, principal with Shilshole Development and Mike Shields, founder and partner of Ironstone Real Estate.
The development team, from left, Scot Car, an architect with Public 47 Architects, Nate Hickey, project manager with Shilshole Development, Mike Yukevich, principal with Shilshole Development and Mike Shields, founder and partner of Ironstone Real Estate.

Developers are planning to replace the site where The Thai Kitchen sits in Queen Anne with a five-story, 40-unit apartment building with ground-floor retail.

Following a new early community engagement requirement mandated by the Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections, the development team shared its plans with residents outside 2220 Queen Anne Ave. N. on Tuesday, July 2.

The developers will work through the administrative review process with the West Design Review Board, and they expect to begin construction in fall 2020, finishing the following year.

The new building will have 1,400 square feet of ground-floor retail space and four floors for studio apartments, each around 400 square feet. The building will be 55 feet tall, which is the maximum height allowed following recent upzoning. 

Ironstone Real Estate founder and partner Mike Shields said he lives three blocks from the development site and has a vested interest in making something that his son will be proud of. He said it will not look like a “hermetically sealed Kleenex box.” He cited Seattle’s growth in the tech sector as the need for more housing. 

“There is this growth that the city has had, especially in the technology sector,” Shields said. “And Queen Anne Hill is a wonderful place for people to live that haven’t been able to up until now. And I don’t mean to say that in the way of an obstacle relative to equity or anything. I mean studio apartments for people that work at those companies.” 

Parking was a concern for some residents at the community outreach session. The development lot sits on Queen Anne Avenue North, which has no long-term parking spaces, and there is an alley behind the site. 

Scot Carr with Public 47 Architects said they are not required to provide parking, and building it would be expensive. 

“There is an interest in providing some [parking] off the alley, but the tight site makes a subterranean garage pretty challenging,” Carr said. 

Queen Anne Community Council member Sharon LeVine was at the sidewalk meeting voicing her personal opinions. She told the developers they should make sure they maintain Queen Anne’s character. 

“We had what was called a village before. It’s supposed to be an urban village, but it’s turning into more of an urban center with the new development,” LeVine said.

The Queen Anne Community Council has not formally taken a position on the development, but its land use review committee wants to hold a meeting with the developers in the future.

Queen Anne resident Carol Jackson entrusted the developers to create a quality building that will set a significant precedent. 

“I trust you guys,” Jackson said. “From what I see here, I trust you to really make it an impactful look on the Ave. To really make the first apartment building look good and be a standard to many others,” Jackson said.

There are other apartment buildings on Queen Anne Avenue North, such as Sweetbrier apartment building on Crockett Street and The Queen Anne Collection above Trader Joe’s. The apartment building planned for 2220 Queen Anne Ave. N. will be the furthest north on the avenue to date.

Shields tells Queen Anne News the owners of The Thai Kitchen have plans to retire next summer.